Tag Archives: Nelson Mandela

Fighting for Justice

29 Aug

It is only 20 years since we witnessed the beginning of the end of Apartheid in South Africa. It heralded a new era of emancipation for the black community who had for so long been disenfranchised as ‘non-citizens’ under a system of racial discrimination and became victims of repression and state-sponsored violence. We know of the courage and sacrifice of icons such as Nelson Mandela but little do we know of the unspoken resistance of the masses who gave birth to this freedom, those who tirelessly struggled for justice amidst great risk to their lives. We think of Steve Biko, through his writings and activism, and the protestors who lost their lives in the Sharpeville Massacre. All gave some but some truly gave all.

The end of Apartheid was a small yet significant victory for our common humanity, of which we are all inextricably linked, and for justice in particular. Continue reading

Invictus

7 Jun

I recently watched a movie called Invictus. I know I know, it’s old. I saw the ad on the billboards and thought it looked rubbish – and I could not make out what the hell ‘Invictus’ meant. I watched the movie because my sister had put it on and to my surprise it was pretty good. The movie did not answer the question of what Invictus meant, and if it did, I missed it, so I dug around (which means I Googled it) and found out that Invictus is the title of a short Victorian poem written by the English poet William Ernest Henley (1849–1903) – (for a brief synopsis of his life and what prompted the poem see Wikipedia).

 The poem spoke to me immensely – especially when viewed through the eyes of the most famous occupant of Robben Island, Nelson Mandela. I thought I’d share it with the rest of you too. Continue reading