Invictus

7 Jun

I recently watched a movie called Invictus. I know I know, it’s old. I saw the ad on the billboards and thought it looked rubbish – and I could not make out what the hell ‘Invictus’ meant. I watched the movie because my sister had put it on and to my surprise it was pretty good. The movie did not answer the question of what Invictus meant, and if it did, I missed it, so I dug around (which means I Googled it) and found out that Invictus is the title of a short Victorian poem written by the English poet William Ernest Henley (1849–1903) – (for a brief synopsis of his life and what prompted the poem see Wikipedia).

 The poem spoke to me immensely – especially when viewed through the eyes of the most famous occupant of Robben Island, Nelson Mandela. I thought I’d share it with the rest of you too.

 

—————————————————————————————————————————-


 

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Advertisements

3 Responses to “Invictus”

  1. Mish June 7, 2010 at 8:20 pm #

    I’ve been wanting to see Invictus. The preview caught my eye, but an interview with Morgan Freeman about the movie and his acquaintance with Nelson Mandela moved it up on the list.

    Good poem.

    Invictus -> in victory -> unconquered.

  2. Sentinel June 7, 2010 at 11:38 pm #

    “Invictus -> in victory -> unconquered.”

    Thanks so much for that short and simple definition. I try to split words into ‘component parts’ when I do not know what they mean and “in victory” is what I thought it was, but you have confirmed it.

    I definitely recommend the movie for those who like to decipher what lies beneath a simple storyline. Now that you’ve read the accompanying poem, the movie should have more teeth.

    Enjoy!

  3. Atticus June 9, 2010 at 1:21 am #

    Encouraging words by Henley which was done justice in the life on an iconic statesman that is Mandela.

    For those who haven’t seen Invictus, here’s a clip of the poem as recited in the film:

    http://bit.ly/cGbwwe

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: